[ Pdf Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America ✓ history-civil-war-eastern-theater PDF ] by Beth Macy ☆ loveonline.pro

[ Pdf Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America ✓ history-civil-war-eastern-theater PDF ] by Beth Macy ☆ A problematic read for me Yes, I know awards and all that But I honestly think the awards go to the fact that Macy made Oxycontin and heroin part of a national conversation, not because this book was exemplary journalism or writing Issue 1 Macy does not feel like a competent research or investigative journalist Apparently, before the book writing gig, her newspaper job was human interest stories I can so see that And I am not the human interest kind of reader Dopesick primarily focuses on those on the front lines but not the dopesick Though it begins by talking with a major drug dealer, it quickly moves to one of the physicians who watched the crisis unfold, and then a very brief history of Oxycontin, the manufacturer Purdue Pharmaceuticals, and the family that owns The informant leaned into Lieutenant Richard Stallard s cruiser This feller up here s got this new stuff he s selling It s called Oxy, and he says it s great, he said What is it again Stallard asked It s Oxy compton something like that Pill users were already misusing it to intensify their high, the informant explained, as well as selling it on the black market Oxy came in much higher dosages than standard painkillers, and an 80 milligram tablet sold for 80, making its potential for black market sales much higher than that of Dilaudid and Lortab The increased potency made the drug a cash cow for the company that manufactured it, too The informant hadspecifics Users had already figured out an end run around the pill s time release mechanism, a coating stamped with OC and the milligram dosage They simply popped a tablet in their mouths for a minute or Shocking.
.
just shocking I had no idea how bad things have become and who was responsible You hear news about the opioid crisis and it s getting worse and we need to do something about it.
.
but we don t Giving out Narcan to folks so if they overdose they have the fix, not sure if I fully agree with it Aren t we just enabling itby this I remember once someone telling me at a hospital someone came in, OD d Given Narcan, revived Awesome They were given Narcan to take with them Later that same day, they were backOD d again But we need to look at the root cause, the pharma companies and doctors that over prescribe Listening into my husbands conversation recently with someone who tore a muscle at work, on the job He had to get their medical history At the ER, they were given Oxy for pain REALLY That s what you get for a torn muscle now This person was smart en This is a well researched nonfiction book about how the Sackler family of the privately held company Purdue Pharma, their sales reps, unethical and misinformed doctors, our pitiful healthcare system that only helps some people, and our misguided law enforcement and incarceration laws created an opioid crisis that became a heroin crisis that led to overdosing becoming the leading cause of death for young Americans.
Our country needs to ensure that everyone has access to healthcare, including mental health and substance abuse care We also need to change our drug laws so tax payers aren t funding prisons for people who are low level drug users It costs a minimum of thirty thousand dollars a year to incarcerate someone In states like New York and California, the cost is seventy tothan one hundred grand What if we used that mon A problematic read for me Yes, I know awards and all that But I honestly think the awards go to the fact that Macy made Oxycontin and heroin part of a national conversation, not because this book was exemplary journalism or writing Issue 1 Macy does not feel like a competent research or investigative journalist Apparently, before the book writing gig, her newspaper job was human interest stories I can so see that And I am not the human interest kind of reader Dopesick primarily focuses on those on the front lines but not the dopesick Though it begins by talking with a major drug dealer, it quickly moves to one of the physicians who watched the crisis unfold, and then a very brief history of Oxycontin, the manufacturer Purdue Pharmaceuticals, and the family that owns The informant leaned into Lieutenant Richard Stallard s cruiser This feller up here s got this new stuff he s selling It s called Oxy, and he says it s great, he said What is it again Stallard asked It s Oxy compton something like that Pill users were already misusing it to intensify their high, the informant explained, as well as selling it on the black market Oxy came in much higher dosages than standard painkillers, and an 80 milligram tablet sold for 80, making its potential for black market sales much higher than that of Dilaudid and Lortab The increased potency made the drug a cash cow for the company that manufactured it, too The informant hadspecifics Users had already figured out an end run around the pill s time release mechanism, a coating stamped with OC and the milligram dosage They simply popped a tablet in their mouths for a minute or Shocking.
.
just shocking I had no idea how bad things have become and who was responsible You hear news about the opioid crisis and it s getting worse and we need to do something about it.
.
but we don t Giving out Narcan to folks so if they overdose they have the fix, not sure if I fully agree with it Aren t we just enabling itby this I remember once someone telling me at a hospital someone came in, OD d Given Narcan, revived Awesome They were given Narcan to take with them Later that same day, they were backOD d again But we need to look at the root cause, the pharma companies and doctors that over prescribe Listening into my husbands conversation recently with someone who tore a muscle at work, on the job He had to get their medical history At the ER, they were given Oxy for pain REALLY That s what you get for a torn muscle now This person was smart en This is a well researched nonfiction book about how the Sackler family of the privately held company Purdue Pharma, their sales reps, unethical and misinformed doctors, our pitiful healthcare system that only helps some people, and our misguided law enforcement and incarceration laws created an opioid crisis that became a heroin crisis that led to overdosing becoming the leading cause of death for young Americans.
Our country needs to ensure that everyone has access to healthcare, including mental health and substance abuse care We also need to change our drug laws so tax payers aren t funding prisons for people who are low level drug users It costs a minimum of thirty thousand dollars a year to incarcerate someone In states like New York and California, the cost is seventy tothan one hundred grand What if we used that mon Heartbreaking, infuriating, incredibly well researched.
This is an impeccably researched overview of the US American opioid crisis, enriched by case studies of people affected Macy manages to show both the immediate, private reach of this crisis and the overarching problems in the health system that led to it.
I personally know 5 families who have lost a family member s to heroin fentanyl Good, strong, well educated families It is happening all around us, in all walks of life There are plenty of heartbreaking personal accounts in this book from families who have lost a loved one, and the steps they took in an attempt to save them It can, and does, happen to anyone They aren t other , they are us, and it is heart wrenching to read.
According to the author the roots of the epidemic stems from a perfect storm of factors the government mandate that physicians make adequate pain control a priority Purdue Pharma, who aggressively marketed Oxycontin to doctors as effective without causing dependency They hid evidence that this was a highly addictive dru An Instant New York Times Bestseller, Dopesick Is The Only Book To Tell The Full Story Of The Opioid Crisis, From The Boardroom To The Courtroom And Into The Living Rooms Of Americans Struggling To Save Themselves And Their Families Masterfully Interlaces Stories Of Communities In Crisis With Dark Histories Of Corporate Greed And Regulatory Indifference New York Times From A Journalist Who Has Lived Through ItIn This Extraordinary Work, Beth Macy Takes Us Into The Epicenter Of A National Drama That Has Unfolded Over Two Decades From The Labs And Marketing Departments Of Big Pharma To Local Doctor S Offices Wealthy Suburbs To Distressed Small Communities In Central Appalachia From Distant Cities To Once Idyllic Farm Towns The Spread Of Opioid Addiction Follows A Tortuous Trajectory That Illustrates How This Crisis Has Persisted For So Long And Become So Firmly Entrenched Beginning With A Single Dealer Who Lands In A Small Virginia Town And Sets About Turning High School Football Stars Into Heroin Overdose Statistics, Macy Sets Out To Answer A Grieving Mother S Question Why Her Only Son Died And Comes Away With A Gripping, Unputdownable Story Of Greed And Need From The Introduction Of OxyContin In , Macy Investigates The Powerful Forces That Led America S Doctors And Patients To Embrace A Medical Culture Where Overtreatment With Painkillers Became The Norm In Some Of The Same Communities Featured In Her Bestselling Book Factory Man, The Unemployed Use Painkillers Both To Numb The Pain Of Joblessness And Pay Their Bills, While Privileged Teens Trade Pills In Cul De Sacs, And Even High School Standouts Fall Prey To Prostitution, Jail, And Death Through Unsparing, Compelling, And Unforgettably Humane Portraits Of Families And First Responders Determined To Ameliorate This Epidemic, Each Facet Of The Crisis Comes Into Focus In These Politically Fragmented Times, Beth Macy Shows That One Thing Uniting Americans Across Geographic, Partisan, And Class Lines Is Opioid Drug Abuse But Even In The Midst Of Twin Crises In Drug Abuse And Healthcare, Macy Finds Reason To Hope And Ample Signs Of The Spirit And Tenacity That Are Helping The Countless Ordinary People Ensnared By Addiction Build A Better Future For Themselves, Their Families, And Their Communities An Impressive Feat Of Journalism, Monumental In Scope And Urgent In Its Implications Jennifer Latson, The Boston Globe In 2012, author and investigative social journalist, Beth Macy began writing about the worst drug heroin epidemic in world history Dopesick Dealers, Doctors, and The Drug Company That Addicted America began in the hills and valleys of Appalachia, the mid western rust belt, rural Maine before rapidly spreading throughout the U.
S In 2016, 64,000 Americans perished from drug related causes and overdoses outnumbering the total of those killed during the Viet Nam War Macy explored the terrible destructive impact on society, those who have helped and harmed, and the brave individuals sharing their own stories of tragedy and loss, casting aside stigma and shame to alert and help others.
In the late 1990 s, Appalachian country doctor St Charles, Virginia Art Van Zee M.
D was among the first to sound the urgent alarm how OxyContin had infiltrated his Dopesick is a semi interesting book about the opioid epidemic in America Ms Macy follows many people and families over the course of 6 years and tells their stories in this book I think I would have enjoyed it a lothad the author narrowed it down to just a couple individuals and includedfactual information on opioids and addiction I felt the book was disjointed, due to there being so many different people written about, and the book jumps from one person to the next and back again It just didn t flow, in my opinion There wasn t much new in this for me that I haven t read in other recent books, and living in Appalachia, I m well aware of the crisis I see people just about everywhere I go who are in the throes of addiction I did learn some about medication assisted treatment, including Suboxone, that I didn t know before so t Reading this book is like a descent into the hell of addiction, the pharmaceutical companies that pushed drugs using doctored data, the doctors overdosing their patients, and the government that seems to pour money into trying to find a solution that doesn t seem to have one America s approach to its opioid problem is to rely on Battle of Dunkirk strategies leaving the fight to well meaning citizens, in their fishing vessels and private boats when what s really needed to win the war is a full on Normandy Invasion Opioids are now on pace to kill as many Americans in a decade as HIV AIDS has since it began, with leveling off projections tenuously predicted in a nebulous, far off future sometime after 2020 It s a pretty sobering experience to read this book that presents where w



I personally know 5 families who have lost a family member s to heroin fentanyl Good, strong, well educated families It is happening all around us, in all walks of life There are plenty of heartbreaking personal accounts in this book from families who have lost a loved one, and the steps they took in an attempt to save them It can, and does, happen to anyone They aren t other , they are us, and it is heart wrenching to read.
According to the author the roots of the epidemic stems from a perfect storm of factors the government mandate that physicians make adequate pain control a priority Purdue Pharma, who aggressively marketed Oxycontin to doctors as effective without causing dependency They hid evidence that this was a highly addictive dru Heartbreaking, infuriating, incredibly well researched.
This is an impeccably researched overview of the US American opioid crisis, enriched by case studies of people affected Macy manages to show both the immediate, private reach of this crisis and the overarching problems in the health system that led to it.
In 2012, author and investigative social journalist, Beth Macy began writing about the worst drug heroin epidemic in world history Dopesick Dealers, Doctors, and The Drug Company That Addicted America began in the hills and valleys of Appalachia, the mid western rust belt, rural Maine before rapidly spreading throughout the U.
S In 2016, 64,000 Americans perished from drug related causes and overdoses outnumbering the total of those killed during the Viet Nam War Macy explored the terrible destructive impact on society, those who have helped and harmed, and the brave individuals sharing their own stories of tragedy and loss, casting aside stigma and shame to alert and help others.
In the late 1990 s, Appalachian country doctor St Charles, Virginia Art Van Zee M.
D was among the first to sound the urgent alarm how OxyContin had infiltrated his Dopesick is a semi interesting book about the opioid epidemic in America Ms Macy follows many people and families over the course of 6 years and tells their stories in this book I think I would have enjoyed it a lothad the author narrowed it down to just a couple individuals and includedfactual information on opioids and addiction I felt the book was disjointed, due to there being so many different people written about, and the book jumps from one person to the next and back again It just didn t flow, in my opinion There wasn t much new in this for me that I haven t read in other recent books, and living in Appalachia, I m well aware of the crisis I see people just about everywhere I go who are in the throes of addiction I did learn some about medication assisted treatment, including Suboxone, that I didn t know before so t Reading this book is like a descent into the hell of addiction, the pharmaceutical companies that pushed drugs using doctored data, the doctors overdosing their patients, and the government that seems to pour money into trying to find a solution that doesn t seem to have one America s approach to its opioid problem is to rely on Battle of Dunkirk strategies leaving the fight to well meaning citizens, in their fishing vessels and private boats when what s really needed to win the war is a full on Normandy Invasion Opioids are now on pace to kill as many Americans in a decade as HIV AIDS has since it began, with leveling off projections tenuously predicted in a nebulous, far off future sometime after 2020 It s a pretty sobering experience to read this book that presents where w

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